Thailand

Tiger Conservation and Vertebrate Field Methods

CFANS 3504

Dates:
December 27, 2016 - January 15, 2017

Application Deadline:
October 1, 2016

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This program is now full. Please consider one of our other winter break programs, including Germany and Ecuador.

Interested in studying tigers? You'll do some of that during these three weeks in Thailand, where you will explore the country's cultural and conservation challenges. CFANS has been a principal partner in a long-term tiger conservation project, and one of the highlights of this course will be working on that project in a "biodiversity hotspot" that is home to over 400 bird species, 90 reptile species and 108 species of fish. Activities will include camera-trapping techniques, prey assessment methods, and radio telemetry approaches to the study of tigers and other large mammals. Your adventure begins with a two-day trip up Thailand's central waterway, the Chao Praya River, on a live-aboard barge designed for research and education. Then you'll travel to Thailand's premier conservation research site, home base for daily field activities and a launching point for a wilderness trip into more remote parts of western Thailand. Not only will you experience the beauty and diversity of Thailand – as part of a team, you will research and gain an understanding of landscape-scale conservation strategies and methods to study large mammals and birds.

Looking for more information, description, and understanding? See the 2015/2016 Daily Journal (PDF) from student participants!
**Please note that each experience in Thailand is unique, and while this journal is a great overview of the program, your experience will be special to your year.

COURSE DETAILS

CFAN 3504 - 3.0 credits

*Fulfills Biological Science theme liberal education requirements

*View the course description and general schedule

WHO WILL BENEFIT

Students interested in sustainability, conservation and management of natural resources.

PROGRAM COST

The program fee will be $2535.00 and includes instruction and three credits, and in-country transportation, program administration, health insurance, lodging, excursions, and most meals.  Students need to book airfare separately through a designated travel agent.  Instructions will be provided upon acceptance into the program.

PROGRAM LEADERS

Dave Smith and Francesca Cuthbert are professors in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology. Smith has a special interest in biology and conservation of mammals in Asia, specifically tigers, their social organization and dispersal patterns. Cuthbert's special interest is in biology and conservation of water birds.