CFANS News

A new research study led by CFANS professor Paul Glewwe seeks to understand how Vietnam "got it right" in creating an education system that has led its students to achieve learning levels exceeding those of their peers in far wealthier nations.

Six Minnesota high school students have been selected to participate in the Global Youth Institute, part of the annual World Food Prize International Symposium from Oct. 13-15 in Des Moines, Iowa. They earned the honor by participating in the Minnesota Youth Insitute sponsored by CFANS.

Greg Cuomo has been named associate dean for research and graduate programs in CFANS, effective Dec. 15, 2014. He'll oversee the college's research portfolio and will be deputy director of the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station.

Plants’ ability to use carbon dioxide as fertilizer and help mitigate the effects of climate change is significantly affected by how much water and soil nutrients are available to the plants, a new study led by Regents Professor Peter Reich shows.

The outlook for feeding a growing global population in the coming decades may not be as gloomy as some fear, a new study by University of Minnesota researchers says.

The report, “A Bounds Analyses of World Food Futures,” published this month in the Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, challenges many perceptions about the world’s agricultural future. It’s the first in a series of reports that integrate biological, physical, economic and spatial realties facing the future of global agriculture.

Renowned economist Philip Pardey will be the first director of global research strategy at the University of Minnesota’s College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS).

Mike White, head of the Department of Animal Science for the past three years, has been named CFANS associate dean for academic and faculty affairs.

Nominations for the 2015 Siehl Prize for Excellence in Agriculture are open through Jan. 15, 2015. The prize, awarded by CFANS, recognizes outstanding contributions to agriculture and the alleviation of world hunger.

Research proposals for the new Forever Green initiative have been funded via a $1 million appropriation by the Minnesota legislature.

Last spring, the Legislature and governor generously approved state spending of $4.8 million to create the University of Minnesota Terrestrial Invasive Species Research Center. This new interdisciplinary center is charged with using scientific findings to support policy-making, application, and resource management practices that address the invasive species affecting Minnesota's forests, prairies, urban landscapes and agricultural systems.